In addition to the discretionary cuts to USDA funding described in last week’s blog, the President’s FY19 budget also proposed $254 billion in cuts over ten years to programs in the four main titles of the farm bill, nutrition, crop insurance, commodities, and conservation.

In addition to proposing to reduce USDA’s discretionary spending by several billion dollars in fiscal year 2019, the Trump administration also proposed to make significant cuts to a variety of key farm bill programs that spend money on a mandatory basis, primarily in the areas of nutrition assistance, commodity support, crop insurance, conservation, and trade promotion.   Congress is not obliged to adopt the Administration’s proposals on either discretionary or mandatory spending levels, and most budget experts believe that Congress is unlikely to seriously consider most of them.  However, they do reflect a willingness to make such cuts, and raise questions about whether the President will sign or veto a future farm bill if it comes to his desk with funding for such programs largely intact.

The Senate farm bill, S.3042, has been placed on the calendar for consideration this week, with a cloture vote scheduled for late on Monday, June 25th.  Given the nearly unanimous vote for the bill coming out of the Agriculture Committee, the legislation is expected to easily obtain the 60 votes needed for floor debate to ensue.The CBO score for the bill was released last Friday, and it contained few big surprises. As with the House bill, the Senate bill is effectively budget neutral over the ten-year scoring period, actually saving $107 million.  There is an unexpected savings of $2.3 billion over ten-years from a provision in the Rural Development title which allows cooperative lenders to underwrite loans for rural utility infrastructure, including electricity generation.  Overall, the trade, research, energy, horticulture, and miscellaneous titles receive modest net increases in mandatory funding over ten years, and the rest are either budget neutral or experience slight decreases in mandatory funding.

 

The US agriculture industry, often the first to feel the hit of trade disputes, is bracing itself as nations threaten to retaliate

A farm in Arizona. US agricultural exports are worth about $140bn a year.
Photograph: Zuma/Rex/Shutterstock 
A farmer in Arizona.  US agricultural exports are worth about $140 Billion a year.   

America’s farmers are about to start harvesting the wheat crop. Close to 60m tonnes are gathered annually and almost half is usually exported. Where this crop will be sold, though, remains an open question.

As Donald Trump’s trade war escalates, a lot of farmers are worried. Trump was elected, in part, on a promise to put America’s interests first and crack down on what he characterizes as a world trade system rigged against the US.  But until recently the president has acted like many of his predecessors – talking tough on the campaign trail but backtracking in the White House.

Georgia bank and silos by Neal Wellon

By Stephanie Mercier

The President’s FY19 budget would cut discretionary USDA funding by 28 percent, with significant cuts to international food aid, agricultural research, rural infrastructure, conservation technical assistance and farm and business loan and grant programs. On February 12, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) released the details of the proposed budget for fiscal year 2019 (FY19) of the Trump administration, the second since the current President took office.  Overall, the budget proposes to spend $4.4 trillion in the upcoming fiscal year, generating a projected budget deficit of $984 billion, a 34 percent increase over the size of the deficit in FY17. These figures do not include the cost of the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2018, which I described in a blog posted on February 20th, which will substantially increase the deficits for both FY18 and FY19. Continue reading “Impact of the President’s FY19 Budget Proposal–Part One”

My Rural America - Common Ground. Common Sense

My Rural America is an independent, nonprofit news site that shares information from trusted investigative journalists.  We choose stories that connect to rural America. These stories, most often about the issues and policies discussed (argued about) in Washington and in State Capitals, are ones most often talked about at the kitchen tables of rural America, and on Facebook and many other social media websites, radio stations and on television.

The difference between the news stories My Rural America shares and all too often, some other news sharing sites is that we do our best to bring our readers documented, truthful information.  We also share the sites of other news sites that we believe you can trust, e.g., one of those is ProPublica https://www.propublica.org/about/ which specializes in doing their own investigative journalism.

Continue reading “My Rural America Welcomes Rural Readers”

Here at My Rural America, our priority is to make the decision-making that goes on in Washington, DC personal to our readers.  With this inaugural website release, we begin by sharing the chart below.  It was first released by Congressional Quarterly’s Roll Call newspaper on Tuesday, February 13, 2018.  The data is based on the Trump Budget as calculated by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) which reports directly to the Office of the President.

In summary, the Trump/Republican Budget cuts State Department, Agriculture, Interior, HUD and Transportation the most.  For today, we choose to focus on Agriculture. There is a lot to worry about, including that the Budget:

Continue reading “President Trump’s Proposed Budget – Winners and Losers!”